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International Students Face Immigration Obstacles When Studying at U.S. Institutions

file9681326749537.jpgStudents from around the world have made the U.S. their education destination for many years. Students come here to get educated at the nation’s colleges and universities, usually with no intent to remain here when their education on U.S. shores begins. By the time their education here is completed, many find themselves wishing to stay to make their new lives here while pursuing job opportunities. In response to this, the U. S. immigration system places obstacles at every stage of the process, such as having to complete extensive immigration forms simply for the right to enter the country to study. There are additional restrictions on a student’s ability to earn extra money while in school.

The U.S. stands to gain economically from having students from other countries here to study. It is projected that the economic benefit is in excess of billions of dollars through allowing foreign students to study here. Typically, students do not come here to study intending to remain here. who do stay in the U.S. past their education period are more likely than their American-citizen counterparts to be economic assets to our country due to their more highly developed work ethics and their awareness of the need for greater innovation in business matters.

The sad fact of the “brain drain,” as this loss of young talent is termed, is a result of the policy of deporting students who have recently received educations at U.S. schools. With our national economy in upheaval, it seems unthinkable to let such an economic opportunity and such available leave our shores as a result of the enforcement of administrative regulations which may no longer be serving the purpose for which they were drafted in the first place. Because this frustrating situation is not improving, increasingly education professionals, including college presidents, professors, and other higher education administrators are throwing their support at changing the nation’s immigration policies. 
In the words of some university presidents from Kentucky who spoke out in favor of immigration reform where recent students are concerned, “it makes no sense for us to spend our time developing great minds that want to be here and contribute meaningfully to our culture and economy only to send them away.”

Having practiced for many years in the area of immigration law, I am aware of the benefits a secure education provides, and believe that foreign students should have the opportunity to obtain the best education possible while studying here in the United States.

My law office, the Lyttle Law Firm, is located in Austin, Texas and focuses on immigration cases and family law. If you’re in need of sound legal advice in either of these two areas, please call us at 512-215-5225 so that we can learn more about your situation, as well as discuss what types of options are available to you.