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Youths Cross Border From Mexico To U.S. As Part Of New Wave Of Protests

border.jpgAs the immigration situation in the United States continues without real steps toward a resolution, an increasing number of activists are staging various kinds of protests in order to draw more attention to the plight of illegal immigrants. Some of the demonstrations are large, such as the march on Washington last year, while others are smaller, but none the less symbolic. One recent protest demonstration, conducted by a group of youth activists, involved crossing the border from Mexico to the U.S. in order to show symbolic solidarity with undocumented immigrants, but this time there was a twist.

A group of immigration activists staged a protest of sorts on March 18th, when they walked in unison, chanting along the way, to the U.S. border crossing in San Diego called Otay Mesa. The immigrants crossed the Mexican border and came into the United States during the march, and then surrendered themselves to the border personnel while asking to be granted asylum. Among the protesters were several youths who had been rounded up in the U.S. and sent back to Mexico before the passage of the DREAM Act. Under this act, many of the youth protesters would have been allowed to stay in the U.S. if it had been enacted before their deportations.

According to the marchers, the protest, which was captured on video and broadcast on internet website U Stream, was meant make the statement that “no human is illegal.” As the marchers crossed the border into the waiting arms of border personnel, many of the protesters proclaimed the names of the cities and states where they hoped to reside. One person said “Phoenix,” while another proclaimed “Tucson,” among other locations in the U.S.

This protest is not the only of its kind. There are more, similar protests scheduled, as part of a protest campaign organized by the National Immigrant Youth Alliance. The basis of the group’s claim is that living in Mexico can be dangerous, especially for those who have alternative lifestyles – such as gay and lesbian youths. Many of the protesters insist that they have been the targets of threats and violence in Mexico as a result of their sexual orientations.

Until the U.S. Congress and the President come to a reasonable solution for the nation’s immigrations woes, these kinds of protests are likely to continue. It is interesting to note that many of the protesters would have been allowed to stay in the U.S., if only they had stayed in the country long enough to see the passage of the DREAM Act. But, until those in Washington give the country a sensible immigration policy, immigrants across the country will continue to be left in limbo.

For years we at the Lyttle Law Firm have worked on behalf of the U.S. immigrant population. We have helped thousands of individuals and families with all manner of immigration related issues. We are experienced in working with even the most difficult immigration cases. If you or someone you know, need assistance with immigration related issue, call the Austin, Texas immigration attorney at the Lyttle Law Firm at 512-215-5225.