Published on:

Future of Florida DREAM Act Unclear

Tallahassee_Old_and_New_Capitols_3.jpgA Florida version of the DREAM Act is currently making its way through the state’s legislature, and is reportedly set to be signed by the state’s governor upon passage. The bill will allow foreign born children of undocumented immigrants to take advantage of in-state tuition at state colleges and universities. Some wonder why bill has taken so long to pass in the first place. One theory being circulated is that Senate Republicans have purposefully held the bill back in order to allow the state’s top executive official, Governor Rick Scott, to swoop in at the last minute with a fierce push and take credit for the bill’s passage.

But, other observers are not so sure that the difficulties in passing the bill are all for show. For example, last Thursday dozens of supporters of the bill rallied at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee in support of its passage, a demonstration which included the construction of an exhibit, referred to as “Dream University”, meant to showcase the number of residents which would benefit from the bill’s passage.

Opposition to the bill has come from several of the state’s Senate Republicans, such as Senate President Don Gaetz. Gaetz recently wrote, in an op-ed piece, that SB 1400 “is not limited to Hispanics” and would “casts a blanket of approval over noncitizens who are in this country without proper legal status” including those from countries which sponsor terrorism. But other prominent republicans, including the governor, have lined up on the side of the bill and are actively push for its passage.

The kinds of state-to-state solutions to the nation’s immigration woes currently being pursued are a result of the Federal government’s failure to pass a comprehensive immigration package. As can be seen in the case of Florida, often times those with in a single little party cannot even agree on how to best integrate undocumented immigrants into American society, much less those of opposing parties. But with an estimated 15 million people in the country illegally, it is simply necessary that the country finally have the courage to do what is right and find a permanent solution to its immigration problems. If you or someone you know needs immigration assistance in Austin, Texas, contact the Lyttle Law Firm at 512-215-5225.